COMP2404A Assignment 3 application that assigns and tracks deliveries

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2 Learning Outcomes
In this assignment you will learn to
1. Implement class hierarchies.
2. Implement static members.
3. Use a Queue (a type of first-in first-out Linked List data structure).
4. Decide on and implement your choice of data structure(s).
5. Decide how to manage your memory.
6. Write a UML diagram that documents classes and the interaction between between classes.
3 Overview
In this assignment you will implement an application that assigns and tracks deliveries for Pierre’s Poutine. Pierre’s
Poutine is a very popular franchise with multiple locations across the city and multiple delivery drivers on duty.
This application records orders made by customers, assigns them to a Pierre’s franchise location, and then, when a
location has enough orders, calls a delivery driver to pickup and deliver the orders.
4 Classes Overview
This application will consist of 9 classes.
1. The Location class (Entity object):
(a) Contains map coordinates as well as the street names.
2. The Order class (Entity object):
(a) Contains information about a customer’s Order from Pierres.
3. The Entity class (Entity object):
(a) Contains Pierres user information – base class for Franchises and Drivers.
COMP2404A (Winter 23) -“Introduction to Software Engineering”
Assignment 3 of 4 – Due Sunday March 19th, 11:59 pm
4. The Franchise class (Entity object):
(a) An Entity representing a Pierres franchise location.
5. The Driver class (Entity object):
(a) An Entity who pickups and delivers Orders.
6. The Queue class (Container object):
(a) A ’first-in first-out’ data structure made from a linked list to store Orders.
7. The Pierres class.
(a) Manages the Drivers and Franchises of Pierres.
(b) Coordinates taking, picking up, and delivering Orders.
8. The Controller class (Control object):
(a) Controls the interaction of Pierres with the View.
9. The View class (Boundary object):
(a) Provides a user menu, takes input, and gives output.
In addition, we will be using std::cout as the main View output object for error reporting.
5 Instructions
Download the starting code from Brightspace. It includes some global functions that you are to use for testing. All
member variables are private unless otherwise noted. All member functions are public unless otherwise noted.
Some return values are not explicitly given. You should use your best judgment (they will often be void, but not
always). ALL CLASSES MUST HAVE A PRINT FUNCTION unless otherwise noted. This print function should
display the metadata of the class using appropriate formatting.
Your finished code should compile into a single executable called a3 using the command make all. Your
submission should consist of a single zip file with a suitable name (e.g., assignment3.zip) that contains a folder
containing all your files. This folder should also contain a README with your name, student number, a list of
all files that are included, a directory structure (if applicable), compiling and running instructions, and any other
information that will make the TAs life easier when they mark your assignment.
You should manage the memory properly in any way you see fit. As such you should add destructors to any
class you think appropriate.
5.1 defs.h
This file contains a single preprocessor constant, MENU_ITEMS, which gives the number of menu items in a Pierres
restaurant.
5.2 The Location Class
The Location class has been provided for you. The distance you get from the getDistance function is calculated
using Manhattan distance. Since this fictional city is essentially a grid, to go from 0,0 to 2,3 means we travel 2 blocks
east and 3 blocks south (in any order), for a total distance of 5 blocks.
COMP2404A (Winter 23) -“Introduction to Software Engineering”
Assignment 3 of 4 – Due Sunday March 19th, 11:59 pm
5.3 The Order Class
This represents an order made by a customer. To keep it simple we will assume everyone orders exactly 1 menu item.
1. Member variables:
(a) string: The customer’s name.
(b) int: The menuItem ordered.
(c) Location: The location to be delivered to.
2. Member functions:
(a) Make a constructor that takes string, int, Location as arguments and initializes the member variables.
(b) Make a getter for the Location member.
(c) print – this should print the name and the menu item (use menuItem as an index into Franchise::menu
– see the Franchise class).
5.4 The Queue Class
This has a similar structure to the List class we saw in class. You may use any code from the List class to put into
Queue, but in addition you will implement Queue specific behaviour.
1. Nested class – make a private nested class Node. You may use the Node class from the List class, however,
change the data to type Order*.
2. Member variables:
(a) Node* head – same function as the head variable in the List class.
(b) Node* tail – similar to head except tail should always point to the last element in the Queue. This will
make it easy to add elements to the back of the Queue.
(c) Keep track of the number of Orders in this Queue.
3. Constructor – initialize both head and tail to NULL.
4. Destructor – Delete all Nodes in the Queue.
5. Member functions:
(a) empty() – return true if the Queue is empty.
(b) size() – return the number of Orders in the Queue.
(c) Order* peekFirst() – return the Order* data from the first location if it exists, or return nullptr
otherwise. DO NOT delete the Node – this function returns the data without removing it from the Queue.
(d) Order* popFirst() – return the Order* data from the first location if it exists, return nullptr otherwise.
Delete the Node if it exists making sure to update the head and tail pointers if necessary.
(e) addLast(Order* order) – Add order to the back of the Queue. For full marks this should make use of
the tail pointer in order to add the order without traversing the entire Queue.
COMP2404A (Winter 23) -“Introduction to Software Engineering”
Assignment 3 of 4 – Due Sunday March 19th, 11:59 pm
5.5 The Entity Class
1. Member variables (these should be protected):
(a) string id: The unique id of this Entity.
(b) string name: The name of the Driver or Franchise owner.
(c) Location: The location of this Entity.
(d) Queue orders: The orders at this Franchise awaiting pickup by a Driver, or the orders currently being
delivered by a Driver.
2. Make a setter for Location.
3. Make a constructor that takes the following 4 arguments in order: char, int, string, Location. This
constructor should concatenate the character code with the first int and store it in the id string. For instance,
if I pass in ’F’ and 23 as arguments, then id = “F23”. The char will be used to differentiate between Drivers
and Franchises (and any future types we wish to add). The string is the name of the Franchise owner or
Driver.
4. Update Monday March 6: Make a getNumOrders() function that returns the number of Orders this
Entity has in its Queue.
5. Make an Order* getNextOrder function that removes and returns the Order at the front of the Queue if one
exists, or returns nullptr otherwise.
6. Make an addOrder(Order* order) function that adds the given Order* to the back of the Queue.
7. Make a print function that prints out all the information including Location and number of Orders (you do
not need to print out the Orders themselves).
8. Make a equals function that accepts a string id as an argument and returns true if this Entity::id is equal
to it and false otherwise.
5.6 The Driver Class
This class should inherit from Entity.
1. Add the following class variables:
(a) const char code: This should be set to ’D’ (for driver).
(b) int nextId: This will produce the next id number to be passed into the Entity constructor.
2. Member functions:
(a) Make a constructor that takes string name and Location as arguments, in that order. Initialize all
member variables. Provide a default constructor by using default arguments.
(b) Make an isFree function. Return true if the Driver currently has no Orders in their Queue, and false
if they have one or more Orders in their Queue (i.e., they are still delivering).
(c) Override the print function. This should behave similar to Entity::print but should specify that this
is a Driver.
COMP2404A (Winter 23) -“Introduction to Software Engineering”
Assignment 3 of 4 – Due Sunday March 19th, 11:59 pm
5.7 The Franchise Class
This class should inherit from Entity.
1. Member variables. These should all be class variables:
(a) const char code: This should be set to ’F’ (for Franchise).
(b) int nextId: This will produce the next id number to be passed into the Entity constructor.
(c) const string menu[MENU_ITEMS]: This array should be initialized to:
{“1. Large Poutine”, “2. Medium Poutine”, “3. Small Poutine”};
2. Member functions:
(a) Make a constructor that takes string name and Location as arguments, in that order. Initialize all
member variables. Provide a default constructor by using default arguments.
(b) Override the print function. This should behave similar to Entity::print but should specify that this
is a Franchise.
3. Class functions:
(a) printMenu: This should print out all elements of the menu class variable.
(b) string getMenu(int index): This should return menu[index] if the index is valid, or “unknown menu
item” otherwise.
5.8 The Pierres Class
This class will will store Drivers and Franchises and manage their interactions. To do this it will maintain a pair
of data structures of your choice. You may use vectors, or use any class from any previous assignment or class
code. For example, to store Drivers, you can use vector<Driver*>, or you can adapt PhotoArray to store Driver*
instead of Photo*, or adapt our linked list example to store Driver* as data.
1. Member variables:
(a) A data structure that contains Drivers.
(b) A data structure that contains Franchises.
2. Constructor – initialize any necessary member variables.
3. Member functions – IMPORTANT – Any function that fails in some way should output an appropriate error
message to cout or cerr.
(a) addDriver(string name, Location) – add a new Driver with the given parameters.
(b) addFranchise(string name, Location) – add a new Franchise with the given parameters.
(c) takeOrder(string customerName, int menuItem, Location) – make a new Order with the given criteria and add it to the Franchise that is closest to the given Location.
(d) driverPickup(string franchiseId, int numOrders): If there is no Franchise with the given id,
output an error message. Otherwise, find the closest available Driver (the closest Driver whose
isAvailable function returns true). This Driver should change their Location to match the Franchise
Location, and transfer numOrders Orders from the Franchise to the Driver, or all Orders if numOrders
is larger than the number of Orders at the Franchise.
COMP2404A (Winter 23) -“Introduction to Software Engineering”
Assignment 3 of 4 – Due Sunday March 19th, 11:59 pm
(e) driverDeliver(string driverId, int numOrders): If there is no Driver with the given id, output an
error message. Otherwise have the Driver “deliver” numOrder Orders (or as many Orders as the Driver
has if the Driver has fewer than numOrders). For each Order delivered, have the Driver change their
Location to the Location of that Order, and output something useful to cout such as “Delivering: ” and
then print the Order. After the Order is delivered, you may delete the Order. After delivering all Orders,
the Driver should be at the Location of their last delivery.
(f) printFranchises – print all the Franchises.
(g) printDrivers – print all the Drivers.
4. You may wish to add private member functions to use as helper functions (but you don’t have to). For
example, you may wish to write a Driver* findClosestDriver(Location) function, or a similar function for
Franchises.
5.9 The Controller and View Classes
These classes have been done for you. Also a main.cc file is provided to launch your application.
5.10 UML Class Diagram
Draw a UML class diagram of the finished application using any UML drawing program you like (though draw.io is
excellent). You must represent inheritance and composition but do not need to represent “uses”. Be sure to represent
all member variables and member functions (with the exceptions of simple getters, setters, and print). Do NOT
show collection classes in your UML diagram.
6 Grading
The marks are divided into three main categories. The first two categories, Requirements and Constraints are
where marks are earned. The third category, Deductions is where you are penalized marks.
6.1 Specification Requirements
These are marks for having an application that works as requested (even when not implemented according to the
specification, within reason).
General Requirements
• All marking components must be called and execute successfully to earn marks.
• All data handled must be printed to the screen to earn marks.
Application Requirements: 14 marks
• 2 marks: Driver and Franchise print correctly.
• 2 marks: add Driver and Franchise work correctly.
• 2 marks: printFranchises and printDrivers work correctly.
• 1 mark: takeOrder assigns an Order to a Franchise.
• 1 mark: takeOrder assigns an Order to the closest Franchise.
• 1 mark: driverPickup has a Driver correctly pick up Orders.
COMP2404A (Winter 23) -“Introduction to Software Engineering”
Assignment 3 of 4 – Due Sunday March 19th, 11:59 pm
• 1 mark: driverPickup has the closest Driver pick up Orders.
• 2 mark: driverDeliver correctly delivers the Orders.
• 2 marks: Proper error reporting in Pierres.
UML Requirements: 10 marks
• 10 marks: UML diagram is correct.
Requirements Total: 24 marks
6.2 Constraints
The previous section awards marks if your program works correctly. In this section marks are awarded if your
program is written according to the specification and using proper object oriented programming techniques. This
includes but is not limited to:
• Apply “const”-ness to your program.
– Print statements, getters, and any member function that does not change the value of any member variables
should be const.
– Any returned object that will not be changed should be const.
– Any parameter object (passed by reference) that will not be modified should be const.
• Proper declaration of member variables (correct type, naming conventions, etc).
• Proper instantiation of member variables (statically or dynamically)
• Proper instantiation of objects (statically or dynamically)
• Proper constructor and function signatures.
• Proper constructor and function implementation.
• Proper use of arrays and data structures.
• Passing objects by reference or by pointer. Do not pass by value.
• Reusing existing functions wherever possible.
• Proper error checking – check array bounds, data in the correct range, etc.
• Reasonable documentation (remember the best documentation is expressive variable and function names, and
clear purposes for each class – I am not a stickler on this, but if you write code that could be confusing, add
some comments).
COMP2404A (Winter 23) -“Introduction to Software Engineering”
Assignment 3 of 4 – Due Sunday March 19th, 11:59 pm
6.2.1 Constraint marks:
1. 2 marks: Proper implementation of the Order class.
2. 2 marks: Proper implementation of the Queue classes.
3. 2 marks: Proper implementation of the Entity class.
4. 2 marks: Proper implementation of the Driver class.
5. 2 marks: Proper implementation of the Franchise class.
6. 2 marks: Proper implementation of the Pierres class.
Constraints Total: 12 marks
Requirements Total: 24 marks
Assignment Total: 36 marks
6.3 Deductions
The requirements listed here represent possible deductions from your assignment total. In addition to the constraints
listed in the specification, these are global level constraints that you must observe. For example, you may only use
approved libraries, and your programming environment must be properly configured to be compatible with the virtual
machine. This is not a comprehensive list. Any requirement specified during class but not listed here must also be
observed.
6.3.1 Packaging and file errors:
1. 5%: Missing README
2. 10%: Missing Makefile (assuming this is a simple fix, otherwise see 4 or 5).
3. up to 10%: Failure to use proper file structure (separate header and source files for example), but your program
still compiles and runs
4. up to 50%: Failure to use proper file structure (such as case-sensitive files and/or Makefile instructions) that
results in program not compiling, but is fixable by a TA using reasonable effort.
5. up to 100%: Failure to use proper file structure or other problems that severely compromise the ability to
compile and run your program.
As an example, submitting Windows C++ code and Makefile that is not compatible with the Linux VM would
fall under 4 or 5 depending on whether a reasonable effort could get it running.
6.3.2 Incorrect object-oriented programming techniques:
• Up to 10%: Substituting C functions where C++ functions exist (e.g. don’t use printf, do use cout).
• Up to 10%: Memory leaks – be sure to check your code with valgrind.
• Up to 25%: Using smart pointers.
• Up to 25%: Using global functions or global variables other than the main function and those functions and
variables expressly permitted or provided for initialization and testing purposes.
COMP2404A (Winter 23) -“Introduction to Software Engineering”
Assignment 3 of 4 – Due Sunday March 19th, 11:59 pm
6.3.3 Unapproved libraries:
• Up to 100%: The code must compile and execute in the default course VM provided. It must NOT require
any additional libraries, packages, or software besides what is available in the standard VM.
• Up to 100%: Your program must not use any classes, containers, or algorithms from the standard template
library (STL) unless expressly permitted.